PEOPLE WITH MENTAL ILLNESS AND PHYSICAL DISABILITIES MATTER


Descriptions for Mental Illness and Physical Disabilities

Description for Mental Illness
Description for Physical Disabilities
According to Mayo Clinic, mental illness in a very broad term to describe the various issues that can modify (in a negative way)
The way your brain functions and your overall perception of the world. Mental Illness can be as common as depression and addiction, or as complex as schizophrenia.


A disability aging and special needs, the numbers don't get better. We can help by giving them our attention and participating in special events for the handicapped.



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Why does this topic break your heart?

"My papa had a stroke and since, he has been paralyzed and is unable to speak now. He is a special needs person and that is why this project is in my heart." Darrah WHS
"My aunt was in a car accident when she was 16 and was thrown from the car. She is now paralyzed in half of her body. Her disability makes this project dear to me." Leann WHS
"I have the privilege of being able to babysit 8-year-old twins with special needs. There is never a dull moment with them and I am grateful to have them in my life." Loren WHS
"This heartbreak breaks my heart because having a mental illness is terrible. People with mental illnesses have an unfair disadvantage in life and can’t do most things that other people do." Hunter FBS
"Mental Illness breaks my heart because you can’t choose to not be born that way. Physical disabilities are also something that you may receive and can never get rid of. It’s something that they have to deal with every day for the rest of their lives." Justin FBS
"Physical and mental disabilities break my heart because they change the way people will look at you, treat you, and talk about you. It won't go away but the people treat them differently could. People with a mental illness are often mistreated. Most people don't know enough about mental illnesses and act inappropriately. That is why it breaks my heart." Jared FBS
"My grandmother suffers a mental Illness case of Alzheimer's Disease with her stage is currently 4-5, which the thought of losing someone from this disease would shatter my heart. One of the types of mental Illness is Alzheimer's Disease which break my heart due to my grandmother having nearly the 4th to 5th stage of this mental Illness." ZrochSmith FBS
Mental illnesses break my heart because they can completely impair a person from accomplishing what they aspire for. Despite this, people persevere and do their best despite their handicaps, but even then, few are able to attain anything incredible. Mental illnesses defeat the very concept that allows people to succeed, will, by impairing the body in various ways." Caleb FBS
"Mental illness breaks my heart because it's unavoidable. When you're born, you basically spin the wheel, and you're stuck with whatever it lands on. Some people get glasses, some people get braces, some get neither, and some people get mental illness. In the same way that you can't help poor eyesight or crooked teeth, you can't help a mental disease. As such, mentally ill people shouldn't be discriminated, because you wouldn't make fun of someone for having glasses." Jacob FBS
"I have read many books about people that have had mental illnesses and watched many movies that have had main characters with mental illnesses. These characters break my heart. They make me think of the possibility of loved ones I know getting mental illnesses and it would be horrible." Cody FBS





Why do you believe others should care about this topic?

I think other people should care about this Heartbreak because they don't realize how much of a problem it is that disabled people are being treated like they don't matter.I think other people should care about this Heartbreak because they don't realize how much of a problem it is that disabled people are being treated like they don't matter.
People should care about this heartbreak because people often just feel sorry for those with special needs rather than actually make them feel like they matter.
People who can't be sympathetic towards mentally disabled people are monsters. Put yourself in their position, and imagine you were born with a handicap without a choice in the matter.


Research and Statistics over this Heartbreak

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Mental Illness

Two in-depth definitions of mental illness would be "...a condition that impacts a person's thinking, feeling or mood and may affect his or her ability to relate to others and function on a daily basis. Each person will have different experiences, even people with the same diagnosis.
Recovery, including meaningful roles in social life, school and work, is possible, especially when you start treatment early and play a strong role in your own recovery process. A mental health condition isn’t the result of one event. Research suggests multiple, interlinking causes. Genetics, environment and lifestyle combine to influence whether someone develops a mental health condition. A stressful job or home life makes some people more susceptible, as do traumatic life events like being the victim of a crime. Biochemical processes and circuits as well as basic brain structure may play a role too.” (This definition was provided by NAMI. You can find more information on the topic at https://www.nami.org/Learn-More/Mental-Health-Conditions.) and "...a disease that causes mild to severe disturbances in thought and/or behavior, resulting in an inability to cope with life’s ordinary demands and routines. There are more than 200 classified forms of mental illness. Some of the more common disorders are depression, bipolar disorder, dementia, schizophrenia and anxiety disorders. Symptoms may include changes in mood, personality, personal habits and/or social withdrawal. Mental health problems may be related to excessive stress due to a particular situation or series of events. As with cancer, diabetes and heart disease, mental illnesses are often physical as well as emotional and psychological. Mental illnesses may be caused by a reaction to environmental stresses, genetic factors, biochemical imbalances, or a combination of these. With proper care and treatment many individuals learn to cope or recover from a mental illness or emotional disorder.” (This definition was provided by MHA. You can find more information on the topic at http://www.mentalhealthamerica.net/recognizing-warning-signs.



The symptoms of mental illness as a general topic could include various combinations of the following;
(In Adults, Young Adults and Adolescents) Confused thinking, Prolonged depression (sadness or irritability), Feelings of extreme highs and lows, Excessive fears, worries and anxieties, Social withdrawal, Dramatic changes in eating or sleeping habits, Strong feelings of anger, Strange thoughts (delusions), Seeing or hearing things that aren't there (hallucinations), Growing inability to cope with daily problems and activities, Suicidal thoughts, Numerous unexplained physical ailments, and Substance abuse.
(In Older Children and Pre-Adolescents) Substance abuse, Inability to cope with problems and daily activities, Changes in sleeping and/or eating habits, Excessive complaints of physical ailments, Changes in ability to manage responsibilities - at home and/or at school, Defiance of authority, truancy, theft, and/or vandalism, Intense fear, Prolonged negative mood, often accompanied by poor appetite or thoughts of death, and Frequent outbursts of anger.
(In Younger Children) Changes in school performance, Poor grades despite strong efforts, Changes in sleeping and/or eating habits, Excessive worry or anxiety (i.e. refusing to go to bed or school), Hyperactivity, Persistent nightmares, Persistent disobedience or aggression, and Frequent temper tantrums. (This information was provided by MHA. You can find more information on the topic at http://www.mentalhealthamerica.net/recognizing-warning-signs.)

This article details the social pressure and struggles mentally handicapped people experience, and how your attitude can affect them; http://www.huffingtonpost.com/rachel-griffin/9-reasons-why-you-need-to-stop-stigmatizing-people-with-mental-illness-_b_8801424.html. It can help others understand why stigmatizing people is ultimately bad, and gives others who don't suffer from a mental illness a more in-depth look at the people who do and their emotions/though processes.

NAMI's "Mental Health by the Numbers" infographics give a good overview of the general statistics of mental health;

Other infographics by NAMI include the following;


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Prevalence of Mental Illness

Social Stats

Consequences of Lack of Treatment

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Other Statistics

A list of typical, or more common, mental illnesses would include things such as;



Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)
Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is characterized by inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity. ADHD is most commonly diagnosed in young people, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). An estimated 9% of children between ages 3–17 have ADHD. While ADHD is usually diagnosed in childhood, it does not only affect children. An estimated 4% of adults have ADHD. (This information was provided by NAMI, you can find more on the topic at http://www.nami.org/Learn-More/Mental-Health-Conditions/ADHD.)

Alzheimer’s
As Alzheimer’s disease progresses, people experience greater memory loss and other cognitive difficulties. Problems can include wandering and getting lost, trouble handling money and paying bills (PDF, 159K), repeating questions, taking longer to complete normal daily tasks, and personality and behavior changes. People are often diagnosed in this stage.
In this stage, damage occurs in areas of the brain that control language, reasoning, sensory processing, and conscious thought. Memory loss and confusion grow worse, and people begin to have problems recognizing family and friends. They may be unable to learn new things, carry out multi-step tasks such as getting dressed, or cope with new situations. In addition, people at this stage may have hallucinations, delusions, and paranoia and may behave impulsively.
Ultimately, plaques and tangles spread throughout the brain, and brain tissue shrinks significantly. People with severe Alzheimer’s cannot communicate and are completely dependent on others for their care. Near the end, the person may be in bed most or all of the time as the body shuts down. (This information was provided by NIA, you can find more on the topic at https://www.nia.nih.gov/alzheimers/publication/alzheimers-disease-fact-sheet.)

Anxiety Disorders
Everyone experiences anxiety. However, when feelings of intense fear and distress are overwhelming and prevent us from doing everyday things, an anxiety disorder may be the cause. Anxiety disorders are the most common mental health concern in the United States. An estimated 40 million adults in the U.S., or 18%, have an anxiety disorder. Approximately 8% of children and teenagers experience the negative impact of an anxiety disorder at school and at home. (This information was provided by NAMI, you can find more on the topic at http://www.nami.org/Learn-More/Mental-Health-Conditions/Anxiety-Disorders.)

Autism
Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a developmental disorder that affects a person’s ability to socialize and communicate with others. ASD can also result in restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interests or activities. The term “spectrum” refers to the wide range of symptoms, skills and levels of impairment or disability that people with ASD can have. Some people are mildly impaired by their symptoms, while others are severely disabled. The prevalence rate for ASD is 1 in 68 children and rising. Boys are four times more likely than girls to develop ASD. ASD crosses racial, ethnic, and social backgrounds equally. Awareness of this disorder and improved screening methods have contributed to the increase in diagnoses in recent years. (This information was provided by NAMI, you can find more on the topic at http://www.nami.org/Learn-More/Mental-Health-Conditions/Autism.)

Bipolar Disorder
Bipolar disorder is a chronic mental illness that causes dramatic shifts in a person's mood, energy, and ability to think clearly. People with bipolar disorder have high and low moods, known as mania and depression, which differs from the typical ups and downs most people experience. If left untreated, the symptoms usually get worse. However, with a strong lifestyle that includes self-management and a good treatment plan, many people live well with the condition. Although bipolar disorder can occur at any point in life, the average age of onset is 25. Every year, 2.9% of the U.S. population is diagnosed with bipolar disorder, with nearly 83% of cases being classified as severe. Bipolar disorder affect men and women equally. (This information was provided by NAMI, you can find more on the topic at http://www.nami.org/Learn-More/Mental-Health-Conditions/Bipolar-Disorder.)

Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD)
Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a condition characterized by difficulties in regulating emotion. This difficulty leads to severe, unstable mood swings, impulsivity and instability, poor self-image and stormy personal relationships. People may make repeated attempts to avoid real or imagined situations of abandonment. The combined result of living with BPD can manifest into destructive behavior, such as self-harm (cutting) or suicide attempts.It’s estimated that 1.6% of the adult U.S. population has BPD but it may be as high as 5.9%. Nearly 75% of people diagnosed with BPD are women, but recent research suggests that men may be almost as frequently affected by BPD. In the past, men with BPD were often misdiagnosed with PTSD or depression. (This information was provided by NAMI, you can find more on the topic at http://www.nami.org/Learn-More/Mental-Health-Conditions/Borderline-Personality-Disorder.)

Depression
Depression is more than just feeling sad or going through a rough patch. It’s a serious mental health condition that requires understanding, treatment and a good recovery plan. With early detection, diagnosis and a treatment plan consisting of medication, psychotherapy and lifestyle choices, many people get better. But left untreated, depression can be devastating, both for the people who have it and for their families. Some people have only one episode in a lifetime, but for most people depression recurs. Without treatment, episodes may last a few months to several years. People with severe depression can feel so hopeless that they become a risk for suicide.An estimated 16 million American adults—almost 7% of the population—had at least 1 major depressive episode last year. People of all ages and all racial, ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds can experience depression, but it does affect some groups of people more than others. Women are 70% more likely than men to experience depression, and young adults aged 18–25 are 60% more likely to have depression than people aged 50 or older.Getting a comprehensive evaluation is important. Underlying medical issues that can mimic a major depressive episode, side effects of other medications (like beta blockers or antihypertensives) or any other medical causes need to be ruled out. Understanding life stressors and prior responses to treatment effort can help shape a good treatment plan. Understanding how any co-occurring conditions fit into the diagnostic picture also informs treatment options. (This information was provided by NAMI, you can find more on the topic at http://www.nami.org/Learn-More/Mental-Health-Conditions/Depression.)

Dissociative Disorders
Dissociative disorders are characterized by an involuntary escape from reality characterized by a disconnection between thoughts, identity, consciousness and memory. People from all age groups and racial, ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds can experience a dissociative disorder. Its estimated that 2% of people experience dissociative disorders, with women being more likely than men to be diagnosed. Almost half of adults in the United States experience at least one depersonalization/derealization episode in their lives, with only 2% meeting the full criteria for chronic episodes. The symptoms of a dissociative disorder usually first develop as a response to a traumatic event, such as abuse or military combat, to keep those memories under control. Stressful situations can worsen symptoms and cause problems with functioning in everyday activities. However, the symptoms a person experiences will depend on the type of dissociative disorder that a person has. Treatment for dissociative disorders often involves psychotherapy and medication. Though finding an effective treatment plan can be difficult, many people are able to live healthy and productive lives. (This information was provided by NAMI, you can find more on the topic at http://www.nami.org/Learn-More/Mental-Health-Conditions/Dissociative-Disorders.)

Eating Disorders
When you become so preoccupied with food and weight issues that you find it harder and harder to focus on other aspects of your life, it may be an early sign of an eating disorder. Studies suggest that 1 in 20 people will be affected at some point in their lives. Ultimately without treatment, eating disorders can take over a person’s life and lead to serious, potentially fatal medical complications. Although eating disorders are commonly associated with women, men can develop them as well. (This information was provided by NAMI, you can find more on the topic at http://www.nami.org/Learn-More/Mental-Health-Conditions/Eating-Disorders.)

Obsessive-compulsive Disorder (OCD)
Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is characterized by repetitive, unwanted, intrusive thoughts (obsessions) and irrational, excessive urges to do certain actions (compulsions). Although people with OCD may know that their thoughts and behavior don't make sense, they are often unable to stop them. Symptoms typically begin during childhood, the teenage years or young adulthood, although males often develop them at a younger age than females. More than 2% of the U.S. population (nearly 1 out of 40 people) will be diagnosed with OCD during their lives. (This information was provided by NAMI, you can find more on the topic at http://www.nami.org/Learn-More/Mental-Health-Conditions/Obsessive-Compulsive-Disorder.)

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Traumatic events, such as military combat, assault, an accident or a natural disaster, can have long-lasting negative effects. Sometimes our biological responses and instincts, which can be life-saving during a crisis, leave people with ongoing psychological symptoms because they are not integrated into consciousness. Because the body is busy increasing the heart rate, pumping blood to muscles for movement and preparing the body to fight off infection and bleeding in case of a wound, all bodily resources and energy get focused on physically getting out of harm’s way. This resulting damage to the brain’s response system is called posttraumatic stress response or disorder, also known as PTSD. PTSD affects 3.5% of the U.S. adult population—about 7.7 million Americans—but women are more likely to develop the condition than men. About 37% of those cases are classified as severe. While PTSD can occur at any age, the average age of onset is in a person’s early 20s. (This information was provided by NAMI, you can find more on the topic at http://www.nami.org/Learn-More/Mental-Health-Conditions/Posttraumatic-Stress-Disorder.)

Schizophrenia and Schizoaffective Disorder
Schizophrenia is a serious mental illness that interferes with a person’s ability to think clearly, manage emotions, make decisions and relate to others. It is a complex, long-term medical illness, affecting about 1% of Americans. Although schizophrenia can occur at any age, the average age of onset tends to be in the late teens to the early 20s for men, and the late 20s to early 30s for women. It is uncommon for schizophrenia to be diagnosed in a person younger than 12 or older than 40. It is possible to live well with schizophrenia. (This information was provided by NAMI, you can find more on the topic at http://www.nami.org/Learn-More/Mental-Health-Conditions/Schizophrenia.)

Schizoaffective disorder is a chronic mental health condition characterized primarily by symptoms of schizophrenia, such as hallucinations or delusions, and symptoms of a mood disorder, such as mania and depression. Reading NAMI's content on schizophrenia and bipolar disorder will offer many overlapping resources for schizoaffective disorder. Because schizoaffective disorder is less well-studied than the other two conditions, many interventions are borrowed from their treatment approaches. Many people with schizoaffective disorder are often incorrectly diagnosed at first with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia because it shares symptoms of multiple mental health conditions. Schizoaffective disorder is seen in about 0.3% of the population. Men and women experience schizoaffective disorder at the same rate, but men often develop the illness at an earlier age. Schizoaffective disorder can be managed effectively with medication and therapy. Co-occurring substance use disorders are a serious risk and require integrated treatment. (This information was provided by NAMI, you can find more on the topic at http://www.nami.org/Learn-More/Mental-Health-Conditions/Schizoaffective-Disorder.)


There is an absurdly large amount of mental illnesses, and therefore not all of them with have information posted here. However, if you are interested in researching some of your own, here is a list on wikipedia; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_mental_disorders.

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Physical Disabilities

Two in-depth definitions of physical disabilities would be "...any type of physical condition that significantly impacts one or more major life activities. That is a pretty broad definition, but the types of physical disabilities, their causes, and the manner in which they impact a person's life are wide-ranging and virtually limitless. Physical disabilities can be the result of congenital birth issues, accidental injury, or illness. When you consider the huge number of possible causes of physical disabilities, you can quickly see how it is impossible to provide a comprehensive list naming each condition. Additionally, one physical condition might be considered disabling to one person but not the next. The key aspect in defining physical disability is not whether a person has a specific condition but how that physical condition impacts his or her daily life." (This information was provided by study.com. You can find more information on the topic at http://study.com/academy/lesson/what-is-a-physical-disability-definition-types-quiz.html.) and "...those who have an acquired or congenital physical and/or motor impairment such as cerebral palsy, spina bifida, muscular dystrophy, arthritis, developmental coordination disorder, amputations, genetic disorders, etc. The disability may interfere with the development or function of the bones, muscles, joints and central nervous system. Physical characteristics may include: paralysis, altered muscle tone, an unsteady gait, loss of, or inability to use, one or more limbs, difficulty with gross-motor skills such as walking or running, and difficulty with fine-motor skills such as buttoning clothing or printing/writing. The impairment may range from mild to severe, may have minimal impact on the student or interfere substantially with functional ability. The effects of the disability may be minimized through appropriate environmental adaptations and/or the use of assistive devices." (This information was provided by NL, CA. You can find more information on the topic at http://www.ed.gov.nl.ca/edu/k12/studentsupportservices/physical.html.)




Special-education-degree's "The 5 W's" and "Learning to Overcome" infographics give a good overview of special needs;


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General Statistics

A list of typical, or more common, physical disabilities would include things such as;


Acquired Brain Injury
An acquired brain injury is defined as: "Damage to the brain, which occurs after birth and is not related to a congenital or a degenerative disease. These impairments may be temporary or permanent and cause partial or functional disability or psychosocial maladjustment."
(World Health Organization, Geneva 1996.) (This information is provided by Powell River BIS, you can find more on this topic at http://braininjurysociety.com/information/acquired-brain-injury/what-is-abi/.)

Amputation
Amputation is the loss of a body part — usually a finger, toe, arm, or leg. A traumatic amputation is when a part of your body is completely or partially cut off due to an accident or violence. With surgical amputation, a limb or part of a limb is removed in a planned operation. Some people need surgical amputation because of an illness, such as diabetes or cancer. (This information is provided by MedlinePlus, you can find more info on this topic at https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/limbloss.html.)

Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to move and to maintain balance and posture. The disorders appear in the first few years of life. Usually they do not get worse over time. People with cerebral palsy may have difficulty walking. They may also have trouble with tasks such as writing or using scissors. Some have other medical conditions, including seizure disorders or mental impairment. Cerebral palsy happens when the areas of the brain that control movement and posture do not develop correctly or get damaged. Early signs of cerebral palsy usually appear before 3 years of age. Babies with cerebral palsy are often slow to roll over, sit, crawl, smile, or walk. Some babies are born with cerebral palsy; others get it after they are born. (This information is provided by MedlinePlus, you can find more info on this topic at https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/cerebralpalsy.html.)

Dystrophy
Muscular dystrophy (MD) is a group of more than 30 inherited diseases. They all cause muscle weakness and muscle loss. Some forms of MD appear in infancy or childhood. Others may not appear until middle age or later. The different types can vary in whom they affect, which muscles they affect, and what the symptoms are. All forms of MD grow worse as the person's muscles get weaker. Most people with MD eventually lose the ability to walk. There is no cure for muscular dystrophy. Treatments can help with the symptoms and prevent complications. They include physical and speech therapy, orthopedic devices, surgery, and medications. Some people with MD have mild cases that worsen slowly. Others cases are disabling and severe. (This information is provided by MedlinePlus, you can find more info on this topic at https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/musculardystrophy.html.)

Hemiplegia
Paralysis is the loss of muscle function in part of your body. It happens when something goes wrong with the way messages pass between your brain and muscles. Paralysis can be complete or partial. It can occur on one or both sides of your body. It can also occur in just one area, or it can be widespread. Paralysis of the lower half of your body, including both legs, is called paraplegia. Paralysis of the arms and legs is quadriplegia. Most paralysis is due to strokes or injuries such as spinal cord injury or a broken neck. (This information is provided by MedlinePlus, you can find more info on this topic at https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/paralysis.html.)

Multiple Sclerosis
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a nervous system disease that affects your brain and spinal cord. It damages the myelin sheath, the material that surrounds and protects your nerve cells. This damage slows down or blocks messages between your brain and your body, leading to the symptoms of MS. No one knows what causes MS. It may be an autoimmune disease, which happens when your immune system attacks healthy cells in your body by mistake. Multiple sclerosis affects women more than men. It often begins between the ages of 20 and 40. Usually, the disease is mild, but some people lose the ability to write, speak, or walk. (This information is provided by MedlinePlus, you can find more info on this topic at https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/multiplesclerosis.html.)

Paraplegia
Paralysis is the loss of muscle function in part of your body. It happens when something goes wrong with the way messages pass between your brain and muscles. Paralysis can be complete or partial. It can occur on one or both sides of your body. It can also occur in just one area, or it can be widespread. Paralysis of the lower half of your body, including both legs, is called paraplegia. Paralysis of the arms and legs is quadriplegia. Most paralysis is due to strokes or injuries such as spinal cord injury or a broken neck. (This information is provided by MedlinePlus, you can find more info on this topic at https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/paralysis.html.)

Parkinson's Disease
Parkinson's disease (PD) is a type of movement disorder. It happens when nerve cells in the brain don't produce enough of a brain chemical called dopamine. Sometimes it is genetic, but most cases do not seem to run in families. Exposure to chemicals in the environment might play a role. Symptoms begin gradually, often on one side of the body. Later they affect both sides. As symptoms get worse, people with the disease may have trouble walking, talking, or doing simple tasks. They may also have problems such as depression, sleep problems, or trouble chewing, swallowing, or speaking. There is no lab test for PD, so it can be difficult to diagnose. Doctors use a medical history and a neurological examination to diagnose it. PD usually begins around age 60, but it can start earlier. It is more common in men than in women. There is no cure for PD. A variety of medicines sometimes help symptoms dramatically. Surgery and deep brain stimulation (DBS) can help severe cases. With DBS, electrodes are surgically implanted in the brain. They send electrical pulses to stimulate the parts of the brain that control movement. (This information is provided by MedlinePlus, you can find more info on this topic at https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/parkinsonsdisease.html.)

Polio
Polio is an infectious disease caused by a virus. The virus lives in an infected person's throat and intestines. It is most often spread by contact with the stool of an infected person. You can also get it from droplets if an infected person sneezes or coughs. It can contaminate food and water if people do not wash their hands. Most people have no symptoms. If you have symptoms, they may include fever, fatigue, nausea, headache, flu-like symptoms, stiff neck and back, and pain in the limbs. A few people will become paralyzed. There is no treatment to reverse the paralysis of polio. Some people who've had polio develop post-polio syndrome (PPS) years later. Symptoms include tiredness, new muscle weakness, and muscle and joint pain. There is no way to prevent or cure PPS.
The polio vaccine has wiped out polio in the United States and most other countries. (This information is provided by MedlinePlus, you can find more info on this topic at https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/polioandpostpoliosyndrome.html.)

Quadriplegia
Paralysis is the loss of muscle function in part of your body. It happens when something goes wrong with the way messages pass between your brain and muscles. Paralysis can be complete or partial. It can occur on one or both sides of your body. It can also occur in just one area, or it can be widespread. Paralysis of the lower half of your body, including both legs, is called paraplegia. Paralysis of the arms and legs is quadriplegia. Most paralysis is due to strokes or injuries such as spinal cord injury or a broken neck. (This information is provided by MedlinePlus, you can find more info on this topic at https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/paralysis.html.)

Developmental Coordination Disorder
Developmental coordination disorder is a childhood disorder that leads to poor coordination and clumsiness. A small number of school-age children have some kind of developmental coordination disorder. Developmental coordination disorder may occur alone or with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or other learning disorders, such as communication disorders or disorder of written expression. (This information is provided by MedlinePlus, you can find more info on this topic at https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001533.htm.)

Spina Bifida
Spina bifida is a neural tube defect - a type of birth defect of the brain, spine, or spinal cord. It happens if the spinal column of the fetus doesn't close completely during the first month of pregnancy. This can damage the nerves and spinal cord. Screening tests during pregnancy can check for spina bifida. Sometimes it is discovered only after the baby is born. The symptoms of spina bifida vary from person to person. Most people with spina bifida are of normal intelligence. Some people need assistive devices such as braces, crutches, or wheelchairs. They may have learning difficulties, urinary and bowel problems, or hydrocephalus, a buildup of fluid in the brain. The exact cause of spina bifida is unknown. It seems to run in families. Taking folic acid can reduce the risk of having a baby with spina bifida. It's in most multivitamins. Women who could become pregnant should take it daily. (This information is provided by MedlinePlus, you can find more info on this topic at https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/spinabifida.html.)

Suggestions for APP ideas


Physical Disabilities

Common Types of Physical Disabilities: Quick overview of common physical disabilities such as Acquired Brain Injury, Amputation, Cerebral Palsy, Dystrophy, Hemiplegia, Multiple Sclerosis, Paraplegia, Parkinson’s disease, Polio, Quadriplegia, Developmental Coordination Disorder, and Spina Bifida.

Helping Foundations and Charities: Foundations such as The Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation, MercyCorps, and ETC.

Stats and treatments in Different Countries: The statistics for the physically disabled in various countries as well as the way they are treated, or treatment available to them in those countries.

Event Listings: List of various events in differing location held to raise awareness for the physically handicapped and special needs groups.

Research Centers and Hospitals: List of various research centers and hospitals in nearby or various locations for those in need of locating a hospital or center that will attend to their needs.
Mental Illness

Common Types of Mental Illnesses: Quick overview of common mental illnesses such as ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder), Alzheimer’s, Anxiety Disorders, Autism, Bipolar Disorder, BPD (Borderline Personality Disorder), Depression, Dissociative Disorders, Eating Disorders, OCD (Obsessive-compulsive Disorder), PTSD (Posttraumatic Stress Disorder), and Schizophrenia and Schizoaffective Disorder.

Helping Foundations and Charities: Foundations such as Brain & Behavior Research Foundation,
The Kim Foundation, and ETC.

Stats and treatments in Different Countries: The statistics for the mentally ill or unsound in various
countries as well as the way they are treated, or treatment available to them in those countries.

Helplines: List of various hotlines for suicide and other mental issues from around the world.

Research Centers and Hospitals: List of various research centers and hospitals in nearby or various locations for those in need of locating a hospital or center that will attend to their needs. This includes psych wards, in case a patient would like to admit themselves.
I've added a padlet to share app ideas with.

Our Heartbreak maps and creations

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Here I've created a mindmap that tries to combine the ideas of the two merging groups. I can adjust and make edits if anyone would like for me to do so, I am open to suggestions for adding or removing certain things from it, so long as it seems reasonable.

Our Chatroll




Our group members mapping this heartbreak

Loren WHS
Justin FBS
Leann WHS
Jacob FBS
Darrah WHS
Rachel FBS
Caleb FBS
Cody FBS
Hunter FBS
Jared FBS
Anna FBS
Zroch FBS



Our APP name ideas: In Special Shoes

Mental Illness Database
Help for the Mentally Ill
Understanding M.I.s
Anti-Stigma App
Physiological Illness
Mental Illness Help
Mental Illness Alleviation
Mental Illness Forums
Illness speaks
Special Help for Special Needs
Mental Help
About the Brain
Illness of the Mind
Mind of the illness
Mobile Mind Mending
Mental Mobile
Illness Mobile
Illnesses Without Germs
Need to know about MI's
Mental Illness Info
Deeds for Disabled
Specialneedz
iSpecialNeeds
iDisability
iHelp
Special Needs Plea
iSpecialEvents
iStand
iBelong
iFitIn
Special Connections
In Special Shoes
Special Heroes
Mean to Need
EXTRAordinary
iSpeak
Hear Us
We Learn
People With Special Needs Matter
I'm Special
iMatter
We Matter Too
Special Needs Means More Than Anything
We Are All Special To Each other
We All Matter
Everybody Matter
Day In The Life Of Special Needs
Special Needs Rules
Everybody's Equal
Specially Unique
Mobile Illness help
APP names from the merging depression group;
Help Line Bling
Help
Self Help
Important
Depressed but Well Dressed
Silence
Not Alone
Remain Strong
Fighting for Lives
Strong for too long
You Matter
Together We're Stronger
It's Gonna Be Alright
Love Yourself
Help Box
Help Chat
Talk About it
YouLove
Don't Worry, Be Happy
Don't Give Up
Tell me About it

Physical and mental disabilities break my heart because they change the way people will look at you, treat you, and talk about you. It won't go away but the people treat them differently could. -Jared FBS

App name; In Special Shoes
Project Manager; Loren WHS & Assistant Project Manager; Rachel FBS